Liturgy of the Eucharist (Oct. 25)

 

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Theological Question

How is the Eucharist a response to Word? Where did the Eucharistic Prayer come from? What does it mean? What does it do?

Goal

Students will learn the basic structure of the Eucharistic Prayer and the differences between the prayers in the sacramentary.

Content

Students will learn how to select a preface and a Eucharistic Prayer for the appropriate season or feast.

Homework

(after the class has been completed)

Idea starters

  • Prayerfully read the four primary Eucharistic Prayers, and journal on their similarities and differences.
  • Find out what Preface is being used in your parish this Sunday, and journal on its meaning.

Evaluate

  • Download this form and evaluate the Communion Rite in your parish. Offer some comments in the online forum.

Read (to prepare for Nov. 1)

 Posted by at 3:43 pm
  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Paty. These are terrific observations about how your parish handles the communion rite and about the distinctions in the Eucharistic Prayers. One thing you said about when the assembly is most united caught my eye. Ideally, the moment of sharing in communion would be when we are most united. But I think your observation that it might be the Lord’s Prayer or the “Lord, I am not worthy” prayer is accurate. The challenge is, how to do we do a better job in the sharing of communion to create a stronger feeling of unity?

  • Nick Wagner

    Great comments Anthony. Praying the Eucharistic Prayer is difficult to get right. It can either drag on too long or it gets rushed. Or sometimes it gets “dramatized,” overemphasizing particular parts of the prayer. I sometimes wish presiders had directors, like actors do, to help them with the way the deliver their lines. When I come across a presdier who does a good job with the prayer, I always try to compliment him to reinforce good practice. Thanks for your thoughts.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Stella. I appreciate your observations here. You have a good grasp of the elements of the Eucharistic Prayer and how it is supposed to engage the assembly. Like you, I also wish there were more parishes that could make that happen more effectively. thanks for your reflection.

  • Diana-Lynn Inderhees

    This week was fun with the quiz game. I realized that I did blank out at Mass at the Preface and after the consecration. I do make a point of actively participating in the consecration where I prayer: “Let me be an example of you Lord and if called upon a martyr in your name. Now I know that the whole Eucharist Prayer is the consecration. I learned about the Preface. This Sunday we used the Preface usually used with Eucharistic Prayer II. It is a poem /song that reminds us why we are thankful. The mystery of faith we sing, the Lord Prayer we recite and usually hold hands and at the sign of peace we bow (it is respectful but it can get a bit loud). At this time the minister walk up to the sanctuary and prepare the Body of Christ for sharing. We are not partaking of the Blood of Christ due to flu season. The flow is off during the sharing with the choir/cantor because we are aware that we are waiting for them. We have known that all the Body of Christ should not be left for the next Mass but had that procedure for many years. We have since changed to consume the Body of Christ after Mass. We no longer go to the tabernacle. If consecrated host are not all consumed at the Communion they are place at the credence table with a purificator on top of the paten and consumed reverently by the extraordinary ministers after Mass. The change was upsetting at first to the extraordinary ministers and some parishioners did notice. We do not usually have a time a silence or a song of praise after communion. We do have the pray of communion before announcements. Some insight this week is the difference between sanctuary and altar.

  • Marcy Golebiewski

    Thanks Nick. By the way, I’ll be missing class tomorrow night unfortunately due to a business trip. I have done the readings for class though and am eager to see the posts about what everyone learns in class.

  • Tim Logan

    So after mass, I ask Fr. Anthony what Eucharistic prayer he used. And he said #2, I asked him why, he said it fit within the time constraint of the mass. I then asked him, if he didn’t have to worry about the time which one would he like to use. He stated #1, I asked him why and he said, “because it calls upon the entire Church to partake in the Eucharist…” Yes, I think that is a great way to say it. I would add, it is a reminder that we are called to be one body, one blood from the very beginning, today and tomorrow. We see this also in todays reading of one Love that is the fountain of eternal life, that we too may love our God above all things, and our neighbors as ourselves. In this Living Liturgy we are called to drown ourselves into it, to become it, to live it and to died in it.

    I did like the little jeopardy like session. I think both teams did very well and shows in many ways we have learn much not only from the lessons, the teachers but also of ourselves. What a wonderful enrichment this has been for all and I suspect our teachers also enjoy it!

    As I said our Priest used #2 and the standard preface that is part of #2. As pointed out, it’s designed to be short and sweet and used for most of the Masses at SLM so that each Mass will fit into it’s time slot.

    I have always wondered why Catholics are so concern with how long a Mass is, which I thought was the way they were scheduled.

    Coming from a Baptist background, where the pastor would spend about hour to hour and 1/2 preaching a specific paragraph or so in the bible with interspaced reflection on the connection to modern life. So when you add up the starting hymn, starting prayer, the “Reading/Homily”, the collection, (sometimes the bread and wine), closing prayer, closing song and then the announcements we clocked in around 3 hours. Which explains why we had a Church Social afterwards as most people where hungry by that time.

    But now it seems that even waiting for the presider to exit the sanctuary is too long. :-).

    I am glad that I am not in that much of a hurry, but I wonder if those who left so quickly would do so after attending a Baptist sermon?

    I digress, I would say that if would be nice if our Liturgy was formulated around #1 as the norm rather than the exception. Rightfully the Liturgy is suppose to be beautiful, to capture the imagination of the people, to transport them both physically and spiritually to the very doorsteps of God’s word. So distractions like the fire alarm going off, don’t add to it. So this mass wasn’t as good as normal, even Fr. Anthony had to stop here and there to refocus. I did reflect that it seems most Catholics will not run during the Eucharist , unless they actually see smoke and flames. Kudos for us! :-) https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/113b3b539723c697ce7b3e2b3033c9ef94650e314288ec0a2999f58db27f66d6.jpg

  • Annette Mo

    In our class last Wednesday, what caught my attention was Kurt commented that most of the gestures and postures during the Eucharistic prayer is done by the priest, so what gestures and postures could there be from the assembly that could promote participation. I looked back at what we do at our parish in this part of the mass. There is definitely a different community in our daily mass versus the Sunday mass. In the daily mass, people bow when the priest genuflects at consecration. I like this gesture from the congregation. During the Eucharistic prayer, it feels like a unity of reverence with the priest (who is acting in the person of Christ) as together we, the baptized, offer our gifts and prayers to God the Father, at the moment of Christ’ passion, death and resurrection. When I started doing this gesture, I find myself more focused during the Eucharistic prayer. It makes me appreciate what the presider is doing at the altar of sacrifice. And I see myself thanking Christ for his sacrifice for me. I also like it when the priest says out loud (though softy) their prayer over the gifts as they wash their hands, I now understand what they are doing outside of just mumbling, in my mind, it shows their humility as they offer to God their contrite heart on behalf of the assembly, it makes them human and relatable. Such simple gestures, yet a strong impression of reverence and love.

  • Yolanda C Garcia

    After our class last Wed., I thought I would take a look at how we prepare for the Communion Rite as part of the Liturgy of the Eucharist based on Nick’s form to observe and evaluate our liturgical practices in my parish. There’s a lot to say, but I’ll touch on just a few topics. First, we join hands and pray the Lord’s Prayer together and with conviction. Everyone was praying loudly and with conviction, and in unison – wow! Sometimes there’s that extra squeeze from held hands at the end from my fellow parishioner acknowledging our togetherness. The Sign of Peace is Christ’s peace to one another. I believe the peace extended to each other is very genuine. Sometimes there are handshakes, hugs and even kisses on the cheek from someone you are close to. I love this bonding with Christ’s peace with each other. It is just one more step in bringing us together before we receive the Body and Blood of Christ. The Fraction Rite: it is done pretty much the same way every Sunday. The consecrated hosts are always brought from the tabernacle and I have observed our pastor taking just as much as he needs to fulfill Holy Communion upon the congregation. I believe our congregation proceeds to the table of the Lord with reverence and excitement. What I mean by that, is that we are about to have a one-on-one with Jesus Christ by eating his body and drinking his blood. He has given us such a great gift of salvation through this Sacrament. I crave the spiritual nourishment I receive through the Holy Eucharist. This is minute, but I wish we could have larger baked breads to then break into small pieces for everyone. I have been to parishes where the bread is kind of spongy and tastes SO sweet. I seem to enjoy the more fullness of that bread than a host. The hosts are tasteless, but nevertheless the Body of Christ. The wine is usually sweet and a little fragrant. I believe we have a sense of unity like no other people on this earth when we come to Mass and prepare for Communion. We are all called to the Supper of the Lord and that is both very exciting and fulfilling to me. I feel that everyone in church is feeling the same way! We all have Jesus Christ and our Heavenly Father in common – wish all peoples did!

  • Barb Villano

    Nick, your evaluation form for the Communion Rite was informative and useful, teaching me about being more discerning about our Liturgy. First, our parish does not sing the Lord’s Prayer, but the vast majority does join hands. Some hold hands at their sides, others raise them above their heads until after the doxology. Almost everyone speaks it aloud, and I would say with confidence.
    Everyone participates in the Sign of Peace. My wife and I are good Catholics…..who always sit in the same seat in the same pew, as do the others in our section. There is more than a simple handshake among us, many smiles, and then there are a couple of older women who will cover my hand with both their hands and hold it tightly. Our Priest, Deacon, and Altar Servers perform the Sign of Peace with each other and do not visit the congregation. The Eucharistic Ministers approach the altar quickly and that flows smoothly.
    The Fraction Rite was performed with dignity, using the hosts consecrated on the altar. I was on the altar as a Minister, and thought that our Priest could have held it higher and more prominently for the assembled to see it more easily, especially those in back. It was performed very reverently.
    The Lamb of God was sung by all, and it continued until all the wine had been poured and hosts divided.
    We have tried different methods for giving the ministers, about 12 of us in all, the Body and Blood in a reverent and efficient way, and the current process works well. We then proceed to our stations. I try to make eye contact with each communicant, some avoid me, some look directly at the host, and others make contact. The experience is one that never disappoints, as most, young and old, act as if they regard the host as THE Body of Christ.
    After Communion, some remain standing and sing the hymn, and others kneel to pray. The song this past weekend was not one that people may memorize, such as Taste and See, and the contribution from the assembly was not strong during the procession. After we were done, Father sat for a moment of silence, then said the Prayer after Communion, and then came the announcements.
    It is almost without fail that the Communion procession is conducted in silence and with reverence. Many times I have noticed whispers, feet shuffling, and other noises during Mass but then during the Eucharistic Prayer and Communion procession, there is quiet. Those are two moments that I feel those around me and I are most in communion with the hundreds of millions around the world that weekend and the saints in the Body of Christ.

    Lou Villano

  • Lerma Simpson

    During the Eucharistic Prayer at last Sunday’s Mass, I imagined myself in that upper room where Jesus gathered his apostles to celebrate the Last Supper. Looking at the priest with outstretched hands I could imagine Jesus doing the same, as he speaks on our behalf to God, giving Him thanks and praise for life, holiness, and salvation. As we surround the sacrificial table, we see Jesus with his holy hands over our offerings, asking God to send the Holy Spirit to make our gifts of ordinary bread and wine into his own Body and Blood. We witness Jesus lifting the Sacrificial Bread, breaking it, and commanding us all to eat from the whole. He did the same with the Holy Chalice containing his Precious Blood, telling us to share it among us and to drink from it for from it comes salvation. Fast forwarding, I return to the present assembly and into today’s Church. Together with the whole assembly, the baptized and modern-day disciples of Christ, we recall out loud Jesus’ death, resurrection, and our faith that he will come again. We also become sacrificial victims as we offer ourselves to God in service to Him and that the Holy Spirit can make us one body in Christ as we receive him at the table. We ask God to remember the mission of our Church and to help us and its leaders to fulfillment of that mission. We also ask that someday, we may join all our deceased brothers and sisters in eternal life. I love the way we end the Eucharistic Prayer, giving praise to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit for, to me, it truly signifies the importance of receiving Jesus’ Body and Blood. We receive Jesus so that we can strengthen our relationship with God, become one with Jesus and be guided by the Holy Spirit as we live out today the mission of Jesus. I see the entire prayer as a beautiful acclamation of our faith and to its cultural roots. To me, it brings meaning as to why we gather as a community on Sundays and on Holy days of obligation, and it refreshes and renews my personal relationship with God each time I attend Mass.

  • Annabel Tomacder-Ruiz

    I had the opportunity to ask my parish priest a copy of the preface he was going to use today. He was using preface VII of the Sunday’s of Ordinary Time. Reading the preface has reminded me that it is my purpose in life to give God thanks always in everything, any time and anywhere. God loved us so much that he sent Jesus to redeem us and to forgive our sins. Jesus was given to us to make things right again and to remind us that we are to be like Jesus; we are to be obedient to God. God gave us his Son to make us new again and to take away our sins and disobedience. I think if I thank God more often, I would see things differently and my attitude would change. I would remember that God is in control and my job is trust Him. Whenever I take the time to consciously give thanks several time throughout the day, I’m more at peace and know that everything will be okay.

    Reflecting on Sunday’s mass, I was struck by the homily today regarding loving God and loving our neighbor. I wonder what it would be like to have Jesus present with us during this
    turbulent time in our nation and world. I know He would love each one of us, no matter what. He probably would understand our differences, frustrations, hurts and pains, and yet Jesus would show us love and mercy. He would have been very patient with us. Jesus would have come to show us how to be obedient and loving. I, too, must be obedient to what God wants of me: to show mercy and love to others.

  • Kurt Martin

    One thing I’ve found interesting about this class is how much its affected my experience at mass so far. It’s made me more attentive to certain things in the mass that I was not aware of before. I feel like before I was taking this class to learn a little something and bring it back to teach teens or improve our own mass but I feel like it has turned into an appreciation for the mass.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Yolanda. This is a very clear and comprehensive description of your communion rite. It sounds like your parish is doing a good job creating a sense of unity. I, too, wish we could have better bread for the eucharist. The GIRM has conflicting guidelines for this. It says first of all that, “The bread for celebrating the Eucharist must be made only from wheat,” which current legislation has interpreted as no additional additives such as salt or sugar. And it is to be unleavened (see para. 320). Then the GIRM goes on to say: “The meaning of the sign demands that the material for the Eucharistic celebration truly have the appearance of food” (see para. 321). I don’t think it’s possible to create something that has the appearance of food with only wheat flour and water. But that’s where we’re at right now with the liturgical guidelines. Still, we live in hope! Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Lou. This is also a very clear and complete description. I liked especially your comments about those who come forward to share in communion and their interaction (or lack) with you as the minister. When I am a communion minister, that’s one of my favorite parts of the liturgy. I noted that your parish distributes hosts that are consecrated at the altar. Five stars for that. Lots of parishes use hosts from the tabernacle, which I think is a serious diminishment of the sign and meaning of the communion rite (see GIRM 85). I also noted that the communion procession is in silence. That seems unusual. The song during communion is one of the most important parts of the liturgy, and I wonder what the thinking is for eliminating it (see Music in Catholic Worship, 60 and 62).

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Lerma. This is a terrific reflection on the “anamnetic” character of the liturgy of the eucharist. You captured the past, present, and future aspects of our remembering in the rite. Well done. Thanks for sharing.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Annabel. What a great idea! I’ll bet that’s the first time your pastor has been asked what preface he plans to use. I’m wondering what you thought of his choice. Did you, perhaps, look at some of the other prefaces to compare what else he might have chosen? (Not an assignment; just curious.) In any case, it seems that your having the preface ahead of time led to a deep reflection on your purpose in life. Thanks for your insights.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Kurt. This is great to hear! I think many folks sign up for the ILM liturgy track with a goal similar to yours. My hope is always that work together takes us all a little further than we expected. That’s one of the reasons I ask everyone to create a learning plan before we begin. It gives us a way of measuring our expectations for the class against the reality of what we actually experienced. Thanks for sharing this.

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Tim,

    Did you delete this comment from the course site? It came to my e-mail, but it’s not showing up on the website. I’m going to copy and paste it into the discussion. Let me know if there is some reason not to do that.

    All the best,

    Nick

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    *Nick Wagner*
    Director, TeamRCIA
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  • Tim Logan

    So after mass, I asked Fr. Anthony what Eucharistic prayer he used. And he said #2, I asked him why, he said it fit within the time constraint of the mass. I then asked him, if he didn’t have to worry about the time which one would he like to use. He stated #1, I asked him why and he said, “because it calls upon the entire Church to partake in the Eucharist…” Yes, I think that is a great way to say it. I would add, it is a reminder that we are called to be one body, one blood from the very beginning, today and tomorrow. We see this also in todays reading of one Love that is the fountain of eternal life, that we too may love our God above all things, and our neighbors as ourselves. In this Living Liturgy we are called to drown ourselves into it, to become it, to live it and to died in it.

    I did like the little jeopardy like session. I think both teams did very well and shows in many ways we have learn much not only from the lessons, the teachers but also of ourselves. What a wonderful enrichment this has been for all and I suspect our teachers also enjoy it!
    As I said our Priest used #2 and the standard preface that is part of #2. As pointed out, it’s designed to be short and sweet and used for most of the Masses at SLM so that each Mass will fit into it’s time slot.

    I have always wondered why Catholics are so concern with how long a Mass is, which I thought was the way they were scheduled.

    Coming from a Baptist background, where the pastor would spend about hour to hour and 1/2 preaching a specific paragraph or so in the bible with interspaced reflection on the connection to modern life. So when you add up the starting hymn, starting prayer, the “Reading/Homily”, the collection, (sometimes the bread and wine), closing prayer, closing song and then the announcements we clocked in around 3 hours. Which explains why we had a Church Social afterwards as most people where hungry by that time.

    But now it seems that even waiting for the presider to exit the sanctuary is too long. :-).
    I am glad that I am not in that much of a hurry, but I wonder if those who left so quickly would do so after attending a Baptist sermon?

    I digress, I would say that if would be nice if our Liturgy was formulated around #1 as the norm rather than the exception. Right fully the Liturgy is suppose to be beautiful, to capture the imagination of the people, to transport them both physically and spiritually to the very doorsteps of God’s word. So distractions like the fire alarm going off, don’t add to it. So this mass wasn’t as good as normal, even Fr. Anthony had to stop here and there to refocus. I did reflect that it seems most Catholics will not run during the Eucharist , unless they actually see smoke and flames. Kudos for us! :-)

  • Nick Wagner

    The fire alarm went off? Wow! I think I’d have run :) I like that you asked your pastor why he chose the prayer he chose and which one he preferred. I know lots of priests choose Prayer II to save time, but I don’t think it really saves that much. I think a good liturgy planning team could work with a pastor to find other ways to save a couple extra minutes and allow for a wider use of the other prayers. Prayer III, for example, is barely longer than Prayer II. Thanks for a great reflection, Tim.

  • Nick Wagner

    The fire alarm went off? Wow! I think I’d have run :) I like that you asked your pastor why he chose the prayer he chose and which one he preferred. I know lots of priests choose Prayer II to save time, but I don’t think it really saves that much. I think a good liturgy planning team could work with a pastor to find other ways to save a couple extra minutes and allow for a wider use of the other prayers. Prayer III, for example, is barely longer than Prayer II. Thanks for a great reflection, Tim.

  • Brigitte

    This class gives so much insight on the liturgy and I found
    myself paying more attention to all the details of the mass. I am not a part of
    the liturgical ministry at church and last week it was the first time I had in
    my hand the missal that is used at mass. It was a very powerful experience for
    me. I never realized that there was a variety of choices regarding the Eucharistic
    prayer. Last Sunday, most of the parishioners hold hands, our family has used
    that time to pass along a special squeeze between us. It is like a wave of love
    that goes back and forth as we pray together. Now that our children are out of
    the house, it is sad that only my husband and I share this special time. During
    communion, my husband and I walk side by side. This was introduced to us during
    our marriage encounter weekend and it reminds us that we are one. There were
    other married couples were proceeded the same way.

  • Ken Louie

    My observation from this Sunday’s Mass in my local parish in Alameda is that it is an older navy community that follows along in the missal and does not sing very loud. The people are genuinely pleasant and prayerful. Hosts were used from the tabernacle for the Fraction Rite which drives me nuts. This 92 year old church has kneelers and most people after Communion kneel while a few stand until Communion is over and it does not give me the sense of unity. This Sunday the priest did not sit after Communion but went right into prayer and then the announcements started. My best guess it is because of the number of announcements.

    St. Augustine wrote “Behold what you are, become what you receive.”
    In the Mass we hear salvation stories from the past and in the homily we hear how God’s salvation is working in our midst and finally we are sent forth nourished and challenged to continue Jesus’s mission to bring heaven on earth. Jesus is present in the scriptures, in the presider, in the congregation, and most fully in the Eucharist. In receiving Eucharist the more Christlike we will become.

  • Melby Sanchez

    We learned that the Eucharistic Prayer is the highest point and the summit of the entire celebration of the Holy Mass. The Eucharistic Prayer is the memorial proclamation of praise and thanksgiving for God’s work of creation and salvation. Nick asked the question: “Do you think parishioners know or understand this?” This past weekend, my family and I attended the Saturday vigil Mass at Saint John the Baptist Parish in Milpitas. The Mass is celebrated in the Filipino dialect called Tagalog. I like taking my family to the Filipino Mass every now and then. I want to expose my children to our culture in order to get in touch with our cultural heritage, and also the way I was brought up by my parents. When I was growing up, my parents taught us the value of going to Mass together as a family. Unless one is sick, no one escapes what my parents called “beautiful duty of love” which is going to church on Sunday. I thought of Nick’s question, so I explained to my children the gist of the Eucharistic Prayer – its movement, its language, the actions and the message it conveys. I know that even though my children are still young, they will appreciate the beauty of the Mass when they grow up. I have tried to explain to them that the Eucharist is the memorial of the saving sacrifice of Jesus on the cross. And that what we do at Mass in our time is making real and present the events of more than 2,000 years ago. We then sang the Lord’s Prayer in Tagalog. It is a Filipino tradition for us to sing the Lord’s Prayer, as we hold hands and worship together as one family of God. This again brought me back to my memory of my own family praising God while holding hands. It is my hope that I can help create good memories of praise and worship for my children as my parents did for me. This for me is a most important and fruitful legacy I can leave with my children, for them to pass along to their children in the future. This is how I see my faith connecting me to both the past and the future, in the celebration of the Holy Mass.

  • Tim Logan

    I’m not sure which comment was deleted. I only did this one. -tim

  • Nick Wagner

    Hi Annette. I like that you commented on the act of bowing. I wish we did that more in the liturgy. When Diana became the director of worship for the diocese of San Jose, she was given charge of the Rite of Election. At that time, the rite included a moment when the catechumens shook hands with the bishop as their names were called. Liturgically, it was a bit of an awkward moment. Diana changed the handshake to a bow, and now that is one of my favorite parts of that liturgy. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us.

  • Irene Dela Cruz

    Last Wednesday, we were introduced to the 4 Eucharistic Prayers.
    Below is what I see as the similarities and differences of the four Eucharistic Prayers.
    I. The selection of Preface:
    EP I and III will need to select from the lists of Prefaces appropriate for the Liturgical Season
    EP II has a built-in Preface, however this Eucharistic Prayer may also be used with other Prefaces
    EP IV- has an attached Preface that may not be replaced.

    II. Epiclesis – Calling of the Holy Spirit
    EP I – In addition to the sanctification of gifts, it includes prayers for the Pope, Bishop and all those who hold and teach Catholic faith. The Virgin Mother is honored along with St Joseph, the Apostles and martyrs and other saints.
    EP II, III – In addition to praising God in His holiness, it is focused on asking God to sanctify the gifts only. Prayers for the Pope etc. are not included. There is no mention of the Virgin Mother.
    EP IV- Along with the sanctification of gifts, it is a longer narrative beginning with God forming man in his likeness, how Jesus was conceived with the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. There is no prayer for the Pope and others as well.

    III. Institution Narrative
    EP I referred to the day before He suffered
    EP II – referred to the time before He was given up to death
    EP III – referred on the night He was betrayed
    EP IV – is more poetic, there was no mention of suffering, death or betrayal but referred to when the time came for Him to be glorified.

    IV. Anamnesis, Offering and Intercession
    EP I – asks to share in the fellowship of the apostles, martyrs and other saints.
    The Pope etc., and the Virgin Mother are no longer mentioned
    EP II – IV – All three asks for prayer for the Pope, bishop clergy, etc and to share eternal
    life with the Virgin Mother.
    EP I -1V – all include intercession for the dearly departed.

  • Reina Hollero

    It was a fun and educating class we had last week. There was a lot
    of information that was brought up through the Question and Answer portion by
    both groups. We listed the different chants: Kyrie, Glory, Profession of Faith, The Lords Prayer and Lamb of God. We also talked about Eucharistic Prayers I,II,III and IV, which I never knew about before. At last Sunday’s mass, I grabbed the Breaking Bread book and followed our Priest on all of his readings and I noticed that Eucharistic Prayer II was used.
    Eucharistic Prayer is the center and high point of the celebration. It is a prayer directly to our Father, and it’s a conversation thanking Him for sending His only son to save us all.
    Going through the Observation form, we usually don’t sing The Lords Prayer. I can see some are holding hands together and others are putting their hands together close to their chest with their eyes closed. For the sign of peace, we had our priest go down and shake hands with
    all of the people in the first row. I thought that it was a good gesture to reach out to the congregation and to share that peace. The Fraction Rite appears to be organized and everyone seemed to know who was doing which things, like who will help pour the wine to the chalice and who will fill the Paten with the host. In Communion, wine is available to the whole assembly. However, it creates traffic sometimes and the people in the front need to stand to the side to give way to those who are waiting to receive the wine. Overall, in my opinion the entire assembly feels most united when we all say the Lord’s Prayer.

  • Carmen Macias

    On Sunday, our celebrant began his homily by thanking us and
    for the continuous prayers he received. He reminded us that a year ago this
    November, he had to return to his native home to attend the death of a family
    member. This came on a not so foreseeable
    time, due to immigration and the visa.

    This is where he
    referred to the First Reading from the Book of Exodus and the Gospel. He said
    that he was feeling alone even though he was with family; he was longing to
    return to California. This must be how
    the people of God felt, many needing to
    flee their homes for a better life for the family, war, or a death of a loved
    one, their lives being put on hold for nor fault of the their own, not knowing
    when they can be reunited with love ones.
    Therefore, he asked us to continue praying for all those of need who are
    in Exodus. He then proceed to use the
    Eucharistic Prayer II, and the flow was peaceful and when he laid his hands
    over the bread and wine, and the peaceful burst into a wonderful emotion.

  • Tim Logan

    It’s interesting that when we first started commenting they were very short comments. Now they are nearly book page size. :-) I think this is something that has been very helpful for me, in prior classes we didn’t necessarily share what we wrote for our papers. So we did not benefit from this groups sharing we are doing now. This I think is very much us sharing our light to each other and how we can then share that same light with strangers. I think most of us agree we have learn far more in our class interaction and what we read here then from the books; yes the books are still important, but in many ways we see what we read come alive in our words to each other. A reflection of our Liturgy. FYI, the last couple of pictures are from Shrine of Sainte Anne de Beaupre.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/53847d171a09528e8c3acf8c200e5bebd0ddc62fd9338fd706f2c61493ba9e7a.jpg

  • Frank Nguyen

    Last class session was fun and interesting. I became more and more interested in the readings.
    The optional reading on Mass Without Consecration gave the answer to my question what the words of consecration in the Eastern Rite as I sometimes attend the Byzantine Catholic Liturgy on special occasions. It was an eye opening document for me.

    I also appreciate the more the organized reading assignment based on topic of several books and handouts so the information given is more focused.

    I used to follow the Mass and read the Eucharistic Prayers during my first few years being catholic, but later on I am so used to the Eucharistic Prayer II that I no longer follow the text in the missalette. Learning more into the Eucharistic Prayers with the different prefaces gave me the answers to where the celebrant finds the texts during the Liturgy of the Eucharist.